CITY-RELATED BILLS FILED

H.B. 983 (Menendez) - Survivor Benefits:  would make a survivor of an individual killed in the line of duty:  (1) eligible to purchase health benefits from the deceased officer’s employer’s benefits carrier even if the survivor has health benefits with another employer; and (2) eligible to apply for health benefits until September 1, 2012, if the officer died after September 1993. 

H.B. 1066 (Workman) – Red Light Cameras:  would require a local authority, including a city, to install a timer at each intersection at which a photographic traffic signal enforcement system is used that displays the number of seconds that remain before the signal changes.

H.B. 1068 (F. Brown) – License Plates:  would require the Department of Motor Vehicles to issue only one license plate for attachment at the rear of the vehicle for which the plate is issued and authorize a person to operate a vehicle on a public highway with only one license plate displayed and attached at the rear of the vehicle.

H.B. 1079 (P. King) – Property Tax:  would extend the current ten-percent appraisal cap to business property. (The cap currently applies only to residential homesteads.)(Companion bill is S.B. 474 by Patrick.)

H.B. 1083 (Elkins) - Police Identification:  would require a city police department to issue an identification card to an honorably retired police officer who holds a proficiency certificate. 

H.B. 1088 (C. Howard) – Property Tax:  would: (1) clarify that only a citizen of the United States is eligible to serve on an appraisal review board; (2) provide that appraisal review board members are appointed by the local administrative district judge in the county in which the appraisal district is established; and (3) provide that members of a consolidated appraisal review board are appointed jointly by the local administrative district judges in the counties in which the appraisal districts that are parties to the contract are established.

H.B. 1089 (Martinez Fischer) – Graffiti:  would provide that a city may – but is not required to – first offer to remove graffiti for free prior to requiring the property owner to remove the graffiti.

H.B. 1090 (N. Gonzalez) – Property Tax:  would change the amount of interest that a city making a refund of property taxes following a judicial proceeding must pay from eight percent to an annual rate that is equal to the auction average rate quoted on a bank discount basis for three-month treasury bills issued by the federal government.

H.B. 1092 (Christian) – Volunteer Fire Departments:  would exempt certain volunteer fire department facilities in counties with a population of 80,000 or less from certain engineering-related construction requirements.

H.B. 1094 (Farias) – Political Contributions and Expenditures:  would:  (1) require the clerk of a city with a population of 500,000 or more to post on the city’s Web site reports of political expenditures and contributions that are filed with the clerk by the mayor or a member of the city council; (2) repeal Election Code section 254.0401(b) relating to the Texas Ethics Commission’s duty to make available on the Internet reports for filing deadlines for candidates for office that are nominated by or seek the nomination of a political party required to nominated candidates by primary election and specific-purpose committees that support or oppose only one such candidate; and (3) repeal Local Government Code section 176.009(b) which requires a city with a population of 500,000 or more to post on the city’s Web site reports of political contributions and expenditures filed by members of the city council.

H.B. 1096 (Farias) – Historically Underutilized Businesses: would provide that veterans who have a service-centered disability according to the federal Americans with Disabilities Act are eligible to be listed as historically underutilized businesses by the state.

H.B. 1104 (Paxton) – Property Tax:  would totally phase out ad valorem taxes on the residence homesteads of elderly persons by 2021.  (Note: please see H.J.R. 83, below.)

H.B. 1105 (Harper-Brown) – Transportation: would, among other things, provide that: (1) the Texas Department of Transportation will adopt a plan to ensure access to transportation by pedestrians, bicyclists, persons with disabilities, children, senior citizens, users of public transportation, movers of commercial goods, and motorists on streets and highways; and (2) a local authority (including a city) shall ensure that all transportation planning, design, construction, and reconstruction, street or highway improvements, and access roads, bicycle paths, and sidewalks to public transportation comply with the complete plan if federal or state funds are used.  (Companion bill is S.B. 513 by Ellis.)

H.B. 1107 (Zerwas) – County Assistance Districts:  would authorize a county assistance district to raise sales taxes within a city’s limits without an election.  (Companion bill is S.B. 520 by Hegar.)

H.B. 1116 (Harper-Brown) – Radar Interference Devices:  would make it a Class C misdemeanor offense for a person, other than a law enforcement officer in the discharge of his official duties, to use a radar interference device in a motor vehicle.

H.B. 1118 (Ritter) – Property Tax:  would provide that a taxing unit that purchases property at a foreclosure sale may sell the property at a private sale for an amount equal to or greater than its market value if: (1) the sum of the amount of the judgment plus post-judgment taxes, penalties, and interest owing against the property exceeds the market value; and (2) each taxing unit entitled to receive proceeds of the sale consents to the sale for that amount.  The bill provides that a taxing unit that does not consent to a private sale is liable to the taxing unit that purchased the property for a pro rata share of the costs incurred by the purchasing unit in maintaining the property, including the costs of preventing the property from becoming a public nuisance or threat to the public health. 

H.B. 1122 (Weber) – Personal Bond:  would:  (1) make several changes to the law regarding the trafficking of persons; and (2) allow a magistrate to release a defendant on personal bond when charged with deadly assault on a law enforcement or corrections officer, employee of the Board of Pardons and Paroles, or a court participant.

H.B. 1124 (Burnam) – Gas Pipelines: would enact various safety requirements applicable to gas pipelines in a county over the Barnett Shale, including – among other things – a prohibition on gathering or transmission pipelines being constructed within 50 feet of an established permanent structure that is used by human beings on a regular basis, unless certain conditions are met.

H.B. 1125 (Burnam) – Gas Pipelines: would provide that the Texas Railroad Commission shall conduct a study regarding, among other things, the odorization of natural gas transported in gathering and transmission lines located in populated areas.

H.B. 1131 (Larson) – Transportation Funding: would provide that: (1) money that is required to be used for public roadways by the Texas Constitution or federal law and that is deposited in the state treasury to the credit of the state highway fund be used only: (a) to improve the state highway system; or (b) to mitigate adverse environmental effects that result directly from construction or maintenance of a state highway; and (2) with certain exceptions, money in the state highway fund that is not described by (1), above, may be used only to improve the state highway system.  (Note:  Please see H.J.R. 84, below.)

H.B. 1132 (Larson) – Public Nuisance:  would give a person 15 days after receipt of notice to abate a public nuisance.

H.B. 1135 (Aycock) – Application for Political Office:  would: (1) prohibit a candidate from amending an application for a place on a ballot and prohibit an election authority from accepting an amendment to the application; and (2) prohibit a candidate from amending a petition filed in lieu of a filing fee and prohibit an election authority from accepting an amendment to the petition.

H.B. 1136 (Aycock) – Notice to County Chairs:  would require a city secretary to deliver written notice, at least 72 hours in advance, of the time and place of a meeting called by the city secretary for the purpose of discussing business related to an upcoming primary, runoff, or general election to the county chair of each political party that made nominations by primary election for the general election for state and county officers.

H.B. 1137 (Darby) – Pseudoephedrine:  would, among other things, provide that: (1) a business establishment may not sell to a person who makes over-the-counter purchases of one or more products containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine more than nine grams of those substances within a 30-day period; (2) before completing an over-the-counter sale of a product containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine, a business establishment shall transmit the sale information to a real-time electronic logging system used by pharmacies and law enforcement agencies and personnel, such as the National Precursor Log Exchange, that is administered by a nonprofit organization involved in the prevention and investigation of prescription drug diversion , if such a system is available to the establishment at no cost; and (3) a business establishment may not complete an over-the-counter sale of a product containing ephedrine, pseudoephedrine, or norpseudoephedrine if a real-time electronic logging system returns a report that the completion of the sale would result in the person obtaining an amount greater than allowed by the bill or current law, regardless of whether all or some of the products previously obtained by the buyer were sold at another business establishment.

H.B. 1145 (Geren) – Air Quality:  would allocate a certain amount of money from the Texas emissions reduction plan to fund the implementation and oversight of a regional air monitoring program in the Barnett Shale area, to be implemented through a regional nonprofit entity with representation from several interests, including cities.  (This bill is identical to S.B. 527 by Fraser.)

H.B. 1147 (W. Smith) – Geospatial Data: would require a city to provide certain notice on each geospatial data product (including any basic map) that: (1) is created or hosted by the city; (2) appears to represent property boundaries; and (3) was not produced using information from an on-the-ground survey conducted under the supervision of a registered professional land surveyor.

H.B. 1153 (Paxton) – Property Tax:  would: (1) require the comptroller to establish an Internet portal to allow a member of the public to access cities’ financial and tax information free of charge and that includes a link to a political subdivision’s Web site address or, if the city does not operate a website, contact information to enable a member of the public to obtain the information; (2) for any city that maintains such information on an Web site, allow a citizen to access: (a) the budget for the current fiscal year; (b) any proposed budget for a subsequent fiscal year being considered by the city; (c) the most recent annual financial report published by the city; (d) the most recent annual financial exhibit and monthly financial report as provided under the bill; (e) any other financial report, statement, or exhibit prepared by the city; and (f) each current check registry published by the city; (3) require that the Internet portal allow a user to access property tax information, including the Web site for an appraisal district and a table of the applicable property tax rates (maintenance and operations tax rate, effective tax rate, rollback tax rate, internet and sinking fund tax rate, and total tax rate) for each city in the state; (4) require the assessor for each taxing unit to provide tax rate information to the comptroller no later than October 31, or 30 days after the date the taxing unit adopts a tax rate for that tax year; (5) require the budget officer in a city with a population of 100,000 or more to publish in a newspaper and on a Web site (if maintained by the city) an exhibit that shows: (a) the aggregate amount paid from each fund for the four preceding quarters and the balance to the debit or credit of each fund; (b) the amount of municipal indebtedness; (c) the respective dates of accrual of that indebtedness; (d) to whom the debt is owed; (e) the reason for the debt; and (f) the amount to the debit or credit of each officer or other person with whom an account is kept in the municipal finance records; and (6) require the budget officer in a city with a population of 100,000 or more to publish in a newspaper and on a Web site (if maintained by the city) a monthly report on the financial condition of the city that includes: (a) all of the facts of interest related to the financial condition of the municipality; (b) a consolidated balance sheet; (c) a complete statement of the balances on hand at the beginning and end of the month; (d) a statement of the aggregate receipts and disbursements of each fund; (e) a statement of transfers to and from each fund; (f) a statement of the bond and warrant indebtedness with corresponding rates of interest; and (g) a summarized budget statement that shows the expenses paid from the budget, any encumbrances against the budgets, and the amounts available for further expenditures.

H.B. 1154 (Walle) – Eight Liners:  would: (1) authorize the comptroller to assess a penalty between $50 and $2,000 against an owner or operator of a coin-operated machine who is convicted, in relation to owning or operating the machine, of keeping a gambling place or possessing a gambling device, equipment, or paraphernalia; (2) provide that in a suit to recover the penalty, the comptroller or attorney general may recover reasonable expenses; (3) authorize a city to assess a civil penalty against an owner or operator of a coin-operated machine who is convicted, in relation to owning or operating the machine, of keeping a gambling place or possessing a gambling device, equipment, or paraphernalia; (4) authorize a city to sue to collect the civil penalty and, in the suit, recover reasonable expenses; and (5) allow a person assessed a civil penalty to request a hearing in accordance with applicable city hearing procedures.

H.B. 1163 (Elkins) – Police Tuition Exemption:  would provide for tuition and fee exemptions for certain police officers enrolled in college classes related to law enforcement or criminal justice. 

H.B. 1164 (Keffer) – Engineering: would prohibit the Texas Board of Professional Engineers from taking any enforcement action or imposing an administrative penalty for a violation of the Engineering Practices Act on a political subdivision of the state or a public official or employee of the state or of a political subdivision of the state who is not licensed under the Act.          

H.B. 1168 (D. Miller) – Smoke Alarms and Fire Extinguishers:  would make several changes to the law regarding smoke alarms and fire extinguishers in residential rental units, including that: (1) a local ordinance could not require that a smoke alarm powered by alternating current, rather than battery, be installed in a dwelling unit built before September 1, 1987, unless: (a) the interior of the unit is repaired, remodeled, or rebuilt at a projected cost of more than $5,000 and requires a building permit; or (b) an addition occurs to the unit at a projected cost of more than $5,000; and (2) if a dwelling unit was occupied as a residence before September 1, 2011, or a certificate of occupancy was issued before that date, a smoke alarm may be powered by battery, alternating current, or other power source and is not required to be interconnected with other smoke alarms but that the alarm must comply with any local ordinance in effect at the time the unit was first occupied or a certificate of occupancy was issued requiring the alarm be powered by alternating current or other power source.

H.B. 1175 (Workman) – City Council Elections:  would:  (1) require the city council of a city with a population of 500,000 or more to consist of a mayor elected at large and at least six members elected from single-member districts; and (2) require, among other things, that the single-member districts be compact, consist of contiguous territory, and be of equal population. (Companion bill is S.B. 380  by Wentworth.) 

H.B. 1178 (Flynn) – Personnelwould: (1)  make it an unlawful employment practice for an employer, including a city, to terminate or not rehire an individual based on their service in the state militia; and (2) provide a procedure under which the Texas Workforce Commission reviews complaints regarding an alleged unemployment practice under the bill.  

H.B. 1181 (Deshotel) – Department of Rural Affairs: would abolish the Texas Department of Rural Affairs and transfer its functions to the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs, Department of State Health Services, and Department of Agriculture. 

H.B. 1183 (Raymond) – Eight Liners:  would: (1) authorize a commissioners court and – in some instances – a city, to order, on proper petition, a local option election to legalize or prohibit the operation of eight-liners; and (2) authorize the imposition of a fee on eight-liner owners and provide for the allocation of the fee revenue as follows:  (a) thirty percent to the state’s general revenue fund; and (b) seventy percent to a city in which the eight-liner is located.

H.B. 1184 (Legler) – Property Tax:  would reduce the property tax appraisal cap from ten to five percent, and apply the five percent cap to all property, not just to residential homesteads.  (Note: please see H.J.R. 87, below.)

H.B. 1192 (Castro) – Mandated Health Benefitwould require a group health benefit plan to provide coverage for serious emotional disturbance and serious mental illness of a child. 

H.B. 1194 (Zerwas) – Child Abuse/Neglect Investigations:  would change requirements as to investigations and procedures with respect to allegations of child abuse and neglect, including: (1) an entity receiving a report of abuse or neglect shall maintain each report until the second anniversary of the date the entity receives the report; (2) an investigation that includes an examination of the subject child or a child in the house may not include a medical, psychological, or psychiatric exam unless the parent or guardian consents but that a Department of Family and Protective Services official can seek emergency medical attention for a child before a representative of a law enforcement agency arrives at the investigation; and (3) the standards for persons who investigate suspected child abuse and neglect at the local level shall provide procedures to preserve audio records, email, and other evidence until the second anniversary of the later of the date the evidence is created or date of a final judgment.

H.B. 1200 (McClendon) – Law Enforcement:  would require:  (1) a city peace officer to whom a violation is reported involving the alleged photography or visual recording of certain payment card or sight order information or related offense to make a written report to the police department that includes the name of the victim, the name of the suspect, the type of information captured or transferred, and the results of any information; and (2) the police department to provide the report created to the victim.

H.J.R. 82 (P. King) – Property Tax:  would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the legislature to limit the maximum appraised value of commercial or industrial real property for ad valorem tax purposes to the lesser of: (1) the most recent market value of the property as determined by the appraisal entity; or (2) 110 percent or a greater percentage of the appraised value of the property for the preceding tax year.  (Note: please see H.B. 1079, above.) 

H.J.R. 83 (Paxton) – Property Tax:  would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the legislature to extend the ten-percent appraisal cap to business property. (Note: please see H.B. 1104, above.)

H.J.R. 84 (Larson) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that, subject to legislative appropriation, allocation, and direction: (1) three-fourths of the net revenue that is remaining after payment of all refunds allowed by law and expenses of collection that is derived from taxes on motor fuels and lubricants used to propel motor vehicles over public highways – and on new and used motor vehicle tires and new and used motor vehicle part – shall be used for the sole purpose of constructing and maintaining public highways; and (2) one-fourth of the net revenue shall be allocated to the available school fund.  (Please see H.B. 1131, above.)

H.J.R. 86 (Murphy) – Immigration:  would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that a person taken into custody for committing a felony shall be denied release on bail pending trial if a judge or magistrate, following a hearing, determines that the person is not a citizen or national of the United States and is not lawfully present in United States. 

H.J.R. 87 (Legler) – Property Tax:  would amend the Texas Constitution to reduce the property tax appraisal cap from ten to five percent, and apply the five percent cap to all property, not just to residential homesteads.  (Note: please see H.B. 1184, above.)

S.B. 504 (Davis) – Electric Utility Rates: would add school districts and charter schools to the current list of entities that are entitled to a discounted rate for electric service provided by an electric utility or a municipally owned utility.

S.B. 513 (Ellis) – Transportation: this bill is the same as H.B. 1105, above.

S.B. 515 (Patrick) – Mandated Health Benefits:  would prohibit the issuance of a penalty for an individual who refuses to enroll in a health benefit plan.

S.B. 516 (Patrick) – Property Tax:  would provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran.  (Note: please see S.J.R. 21, below.)

S.B. 519 (Hegar) – Municipal Court:  would extend the period after the rendition of judgment and sentence in municipal court during which a motion for new trial must be made to five days.

S.B. 520 (Hegar) – County Assistance Districts:  this bill is the same as H.B. 1107, above.)

S.B. 521 (Carona) – Mandated Health Benefits:  would prohibit a health benefit provider from dropping an enrollee because the enrollee uses an out of network doctor.

S.B. 523 (Nichols) – Transportation Funding: would provide that, beginning in ten percent increments in 2013 and being complete in 2022, the net revenue derived from the state sales tax imposed on the sale of a motor vehicle sold in this state shall be deposited to the credit of the state highway fund. (Note:  Please see S.J.R. 22, below.)

S.B. 527 (Fraser) – Air Quality:  This bill is the same as H.B. 1145, above.)

S.B. 531 (Davis) – Sobriety Checkpoints: would authorize sobriety checkpoints by the Texas Department of Public Safety, the sheriff's department of a county with a population of 250,000 or more, or the police department of a city with a population of 500,000 or more; and (2) provide detailed guidelines for checkpoint operations, including – among many others – requirements that: (1)the mayor of a city approve a checkpoint operated by the police department of the city; (b) the law enforcement agency record in writing and publish on an appropriate publicly accessible Internet Web site the procedures used to implement the bill; (c) before beginning the operation of a sobriety checkpoint, the law enforcement agency shall publicize through the use of the media the date and time for the operation of the checkpoint but is not required to disclose the location of the checkpoint; and (d) not later than January 15 of each calendar year, each law enforcement agency that operated a sobriety checkpoint during the preceding calendar year shall report the operation of the checkpoint to the traffic safety section of the traffic operations division of the Texas Department of Transportation.  (Companion bill is H.B. 439 by T. Smith.)

S.B. 536 (Davis) – Law Enforcement:  would require a city peace officer who acts as a school resource officer under a memorandum of understanding between the school district and the city to comply with the use of confinement, restraint, seclusion, and time-out provisions outlined in the Education Code.

S.B. 538 (Nichols) – Transportation Reinvestment Zones: would amend the law relating to transportation reinvestment zones (TRZs) to provide that: (1) an ordinance designating an area as a TRZ must, among other things, designate the base year for purposes of establishing the tax increment base of the municipality; (2) from taxes collected on property in a TRZ, the city shall pay into the tax increment account the tax increment produced by the city, less any amount allocated under previous agreements; (3) all, or the portion specified by the city, of the money deposited to a tax increment account must be used to fund the transportation project for which the TRZ was designated, and any remaining money deposited to the tax increment account may be used for other transportation projects or for improvements in the TRZ; (4) the governing body of a city may contract with a public or private entity to develop, redevelop, or improve a transportation project in a TRZ and may pledge and assign all or a specified amount of money in the tax increment account to that entity; (5) to accommodate changes in the scope of the project for which a TRZ was designated, the boundaries of a zone may be amended, with certain exceptions; and (6) county TRZ authority is expanded.

S.B. 540 (Van de Putte) – Property Tax:  would: (1) require the comptroller to study the fiscal impact that would have been created during the preceding ten years by the adjustment of the maximum amount of the exemption to which a disabled veteran and the surviving spouses and children of disabled veterans, and certain members of the armed forces, are entitled; and (2) require a local government to provide information and assistance at the request of the comptroller.  

S.B. 541 (Carona) – Cruelty to Animals:  would provide that when an animal’s owner has cruelly treated the animal and been divested of ownership: (1) a court could order the animal to be given to a city or county animal shelter; (2) a court must order the owner to pay any costs incurred by a city or county animal shelter in housing and caring for the animal; (3) a court must set the amount of bond for an appeal to include the estimated costs to house and care for the impounded animal as provided by the city, county, or a nonprofit; (4) an officer that is unable to sell the animal at auction may give the animal to a city or county animal shelter; and (5) the owner may appeal the divestment order and the court shall provide either a transcript, clerk’s record, or audio recording of the proceedings, depending upon whether the court is or is not a court of record.  (Companion bill is H.B. 963  by Hartnett.) 

S.B. 542 (Hegar) – Police Chief Trainning:  would provide that a police chief shall complete the initial training and continuing education required under the Texas Education Code.  (Companion bill is H.B. 621 by Fletcher.)

S.B. 543 (Hegar) – Probate:  would prohibit the charging of certain probate fees for the filing of the will of an officer killed in the line of duty.

S.B. 545 (Seliger) – Police Education:  would: (1) require a police chief to indicate that an officer was terminated when filing a report to the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer and Education; (2) allow an officer to dispute a report stating that the officer was terminated in an appeal to the State Office of Administrative Hearings; and (3) allow the Commission to assess an administrative penalty against a police chief who fails to make a correction to an employment termination report after being ordered to do so by the State Office of Administrative Hearings. (Companion bill is H.B. 520 by Driver.)

S.B. 549 (Ellis) – TCEQ Permits:  would require an applicant for certain new facility or expansion of facility permits to, depending on the location of the facility in community with certain percentages of minority inhabitants or inhabitants below the federal poverty level to:  (1) submit an environmental justice report to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ); (2) file a public participation plan with the TCEQ, (3) if within city limits, consult with the mayor to evaluate the need for a community environmental benefit agreement in order to mitigate adverse effects on the community; and (4) participate in a public hearing.

S.B. 551 (Williams) – Property Tax:  would provide that back taxes assessed on an improvement to real property do not incur interest if: (1) the property on which the improvement is located did not escape taxation in the year the improvement escaped taxation; (2) the appraisal district had actual or constructive notice of the presence of the improvement the year the improvement escaped taxation (constructive notice can be acquired if building permit is issued for an improvement); and (3) the property owner pays all back taxes on the improvement within 120 days of when the tax bill for back taxes on improvement is sent to property owner.  (Companion bill is H.B. 234 by Otto.)

S.B. 552 (Carona) – Energy Efficiency: would, among many other things: (1) establish the state-level Energy Efficiency Coordination Council (EECC); (2) provide that the EECC shall coordinate with state agencies, utility providers, energy efficiency service providers, and other organizations and persons to develop and administer energy efficiency programs; (3) require the EECC to set statewide savings targets for electricity, natural gas, and electric consumption that results from the diversion, transportation, delivery, treatment, or purification of water, wastewater, and storm water to reduce peak demand and overall demand for the resources by at least 20 percent not later than 2020 compared to the peak demand and overall demand for the resources in 2011; (4) require the EECC to establish a standing advisory committee composed of 15 members, including representatives from local government and ratepayers from municipally owned utilities; (5) provide that the advisory committee shall make recommendations to the EECC regarding the effect of energy efficiency programs and creating or improving energy efficiency programs to better serve those interests; (6) require the EECC to: (a) collect information regarding energy savings and demand reduction by reviewing energy efficiency programs in the state; and (b) submit the information collected to the Energy Systems Laboratory at the Texas Engineering Experiment Station of The Texas A&M University System, the State Energy Conservation Office, and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas; (7) provide that each state agency, utility provider, and energy efficiency service provider shall submit information required  by the EECC in an electronic format and within the time required; and (8) create fines for an entity that does not submit required information.

S.B. 555 (Watson) – LP Gas: would: (1) provide that an LP gas utility is a person that owns or operates for compensation in this state equipment and facilities connected to a contiguous piping system through which LP gas is supplied to residential and commercial end users; and (2) subject an LP gas utility to the jurisdiction of the Texas Railroad Commission.  (Note:  This bill would appear to preempt municipal regulation of LP gas utilities.  Any city that regulates LP gas utilities within its city limits should review the bill carefully.)

S.J.R. 21 (Patrick) – Property Tax:  would amend the Texas Constitution to permit the legislature to provide a complete residence homestead property tax exemption for the surviving spouse of a totally disabled veteran that has not remarried since the death of the disabled veteran. (Note: please see S.B. 516, above.)

S.J.R. 22 (Nichols) – Transportation Funding: would amend the Texas Constitution to provide that: (1) beginning in increments in 2013 and being complete in 2022, the net revenue derived from the state sales tax imposed on the sale of a motor vehicle sold in this state shall be deposited to the credit of the state highway fund and may be appropriated only for the purpose of: (a) acquiring rights-of-way; (b) constructing and maintaining public roadways; or (c) repaying the principal and interest on general  obligation bonds; and (2) number 1, above, does not apply to any revenue that was required to be used to fund school property tax reductions.  (Note:  Please see S.B. 523, above.)


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